Weekly choice, by peers

Self-Victimizing Again?

“Whether it is your weight, your emotions, your spouse, your children, your paycheck–if you continually find yourself feeling angry, resentful or upset by the events in your life, reflect on who you blame for life’s ups and downs. (…)How a person internalizes a particular point of view about control speaks volumes about their ability to live with a sense of wellbeing and contentment. If your philosophy about control is outside of your conscious awareness then you are essentially a slave to it, repeating the same negative dynamics again and again, all the while feeling at the mercy of circumstance. Over time, repeatedly reenacting the same problematic patterns of behavior causes a self-fulfilling prophesy to manifest. A person comes to believe that they truly cannot impact their own future; thereby sealing their fate as nothing more than a cog in a wheel that goes nowhere.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/having-sex-wanting-intimacy/201312/self-victimizing-again

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The Power of Empathy: A Quick Animated Lesson That Can Make You a Better Person

EmpathyRSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) created a series of distinctive animated shorts where heavy-hitter intellectuals presented big ideas, and a talented artist rapidly illustrated them on a whiteboard. This clip features Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, providing some quick insights into the difference between sympathy and empathy, and explaining why empathy is much more meaningful.”

http://www.openculture.com/2013/12/the-power-of-empathy.html

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High Emotional Intelligence Dramatically Improves Decision-Making

images“A new study finds that people with high emotional intelligence make smarter decisions because they aren’t swayed by their current emotional state. Yip and Côté (2013) ran two experiments to test how different people deal with spurious emotional states that are not related to the decision at hand. In one, participants were made to feel anxious by being asked to prepare an impromptu speech. Then they were asked whether they wanted to sign up to a flu clinic.

The results showed that people with higher emotional intelligence were more aware that the experimentally-induced anxiety they felt was not related to the decision about the flu clinic.

Those with high levels of emotional intelligence are more likely to ignore those emotions that have nothing to do with their decision. For those who find it problematic making sense of their emotions, the easiest solution is simply stated (although not always easy to execute): wait until later.”

http://www.spring.org.uk/2013/12/high-emotional-intelligence-dramatically-improves-decision-making.php

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TED’s best of the week

Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?

How does being rich affect the way we behave? In today’s talk, social psychologist Paul Piff provides a convincing case for the answer: not well.

“As a person’s levels of wealth increase, their feelings of compassion and empathy go down, and their feelings of entitlement, of deservingness, and their ideology of self-interest increases,” he says in his talk from TEDx Marin. Through surveys and studies, Piff and his colleagues have found that wealthier individuals are more likely to moralize greed and self-interest as favorable, less likely to be prosocial, and more likely to cheat and break laws if it behooves them.”

http://www.ted.com/talks/paul_piff_does_money_make_you_mean.html

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Book of the week! Ulysses by James Joyce

Ulysses_(1967_film_dvd_cover)Ulysses is a  novel written by the Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach in February 1922, in Paris. It is considered to be one of the most important works of Modernist literature, and has been called “a demonstration and summation of the entire movement”. Joyce’s devoted fans can be seen celebrating June 16th every year, Bloomsday, the day in which all of the action of Ulysses takes place in the spinning clockwork of Dublin in 1904.

The celebrated novel was banned in America until 1934 because of its “pornographic” nature, a comical artefact of the country’s prudishness. The novel was also labeled as dirty, blasphemous, and unreadable.

The two main characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, go about their separate business, crossing paths with a gallery of indelible Dubliners. We watch them teach, eat, stroll the streets, argue, and (in Bloom’s case) masturbate. And thanks to the books stream-of-consciousness technique–which suggests no mere stream but an impossibly deep, swift-running river–we’re privy to their thoughts, emotions, and memories. As for the result, almost every variety of human experience is crammed into the accordion folds of a single day, which makes Ulysses not just an experimental work but the very last word in realism.

“Think you’re escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.”

An interesting documentary about the author and his masterpiece:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qI7ZnHIF0Xo

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2 thoughts on “Weekly choice, by peers

  1. Reblogged this on Marie Abanga's Blog and commented:
    We can each chose how we appreciate this and so I leave it to you!

    Yet I wouldn’t be sharing this if I didn’t agree to a very large extend with what My friend Cohen is saying!

    Do read on and please leave a comment…

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