Why Trispectivism?‎

[First, if you are unfamiliar with the concept, read this.]

A simpler and very basic explanation consists of the obvious: an individual cannot exist without the universal and, of course, the universal cannot exist without individuals (taking under consideration that the universal here is a structure of something and individuals as multitude). For example, the universe cannot exist without matter, and vice versa. As we well know, two items that cannot exist without the other are bound to be together. This togetherness is what creates the third aspect in this equation, an important aspect that we should never disregard and overlook, the Interconnection.

Now, how to reach from that to trispectivism? If you are a person with a capacity of perception, to understand, someone who is more in tune with some implicit vibrations that are beside the evident physical in front of us, then you are able to clearly see a more profound and subtle view. As you are well aware, one can reach important conclusions about life by knowing and being conscious of one’s surroundings.

Precisely because we are not a one-man world, the importance of one man is essential. Thus, a large part of the book is how we can recognize trispectivism amongst the endless confusing concepts and realities around us. The more you master the art of contextualizing and sharpening your perspective, going to and fro from the individual to the universal, the sooner you will reach clarity.

The road to happiness always begins and continues with hard work, self realization, and a great deal of patience. There are many methods, concepts, and pieces of advice that do their best to motivate us toward what I hope will be a better and happier world. There are hedonists who are after pleasure, ethicists who look for morality, dogmatists with a definitive truth, humanists with the valor of men, mysticists who reach supernatural worlds by ecstasies, skeptics who doubt everything, and nihilists who deny it all. Certainly, there is a great deal of confusion and division. However, on a more day-to-day notion, there are those who simply believe in, say, altruism, thinking about what they can do for this world. The problem is that even terminology like this can be confusing. This idea, for example (and I specifically chose a positive concept), is very noble, but in the process altruists live out of the public recognition as well as their own. Meaning that this form of common altruism is supposedly to do something good to others without any return. Yet I ask, is it really with no return? A friend commented one day that what separates humans from animals is our moral laws, and when I explained to her that moral laws are in fact natural laws converted to human and cultural terms, she mentioned altruism. My simple reply was that animals also have altruism and, in fact, it is a mere form of survival of the pack (or tribe, in the case of humans). Does a buffalo not protect his and others’ cubs, females, and elderly when in danger? My friend gave the example of a policeman or a firefighter. Unfortunately, these professions are not about altruism (though obviously recognition and respect come with the badge), they are about people who choose to pursue a profession with more adrenaline and risk. Is a spy risking his life for his nation an altruist? Tomas of Aquinas once said that charity is first of the giver, and what happens with the other side, the receiver, is simply a contingency. I agree with this affirmation; everything we do we do firstly for ourselves.

The problem occurs when we take these terms for granted instead of understanding them through thoroughly. My friend learned about “moral quality” in humans in church from a young age. To my surprise, even while working in the natural realm as she does, she never took the time to really think it over; she just took for granted that morality is human and it is about being a good Christian and doing good deeds. These kinds of incidents in which I explain the problem we are having with topics, designations, and denominations tend to happen almost on a daily basis, and every time, I see the perplexed look on my interlocutor’s face while realizing such disappointingly simple facts we took for granted. As for my friend, for a few more minutes she began to doubt other “truths” she had been carrying around for years yet in the end, as usually occurs, she went back to the old ones she was already convinced about (changing childhood “truths” is not easy and it gets worse with age).

However, be aware of the difference between what I just explained and other connotations for the same subject. Most of the methods and concepts today share the same basic idea that making yourself better is the first step toward making the world better. For the most part, I agree with that theory, but I am also conscious of the abuse some do in this field. It is very easy to confuse making yourself “better” while keeping and protecting your “truths” with egotism, racism, and fear of the other and the unknown. Many manuals, especially in the working sector, concentrate on personal goals, aspirations, and action to the point that you are meant to disregard all others. It goes without saying that this kind of behavior is, no matter what your goals and motivations are, an erroneous concept. We are not alone in this world, and there can be no improvement if we all act as if we were. We are a part of the universe while at the same time having our own interior universe. While perceiving trispectivism, you will be more focused on what is relevant. Balance is a key word in everything you do in your life, including what you are ready to do for a better, happier life.

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