Weekly choice: on life, British accents and good spanking

A Meaningful Life Leads to a Longer Life

“Many studies have linked meaning in life to health. People who perceive their lives as full of meaning and purpose are less vulnerable to mental illness and are better able to cope with stress and trauma. Having a strong sense of meaning in life also inspires a desire to live healthy: it makes people feel like they have something to live for. But does a meaningful life actually lead to a longer life?

Initial evidence suggests that it may. In a study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, Dr. Neal Krause, a professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, found that older adults who indicated having a strong sense of meaning in life in an initial assessment were more likely to still be alive at a follow-up assessment than older adults who lacked a strong sense of meaning. Moreover, Dr. Krause identified a feeling of purpose as a driving force. Older adults who felt like their lives had purpose were healthier and thus less likely to die.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/more-mortal/201404/meaningful-life-leads-longer-life

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A Brief Tour of British Accents: 14 Ways to Speak English in 84 Seconds

“Visiting London a few months ago, easily as I could make sense of everybody speaking my native tongue, I pre-emptively gave up hope of picking up on the nuances of all the accents people had brought to the city from their hometowns — much less the numerous and subtle dialects native of London itself. Everyone I met insisted that a Briton’s accent says more about their origin, class, station in life, and degree of self-regard than any other quality, but not knowing Newcastle from Southampton when I first set foot on English soil, I had to take them at their word (however they happened to pronounce it).

The video above, in which professional dialect coach Andrew Jack demonstrates fourteen British accents in 84 seconds, might help sort things out for my fellow confused countrymen. “Received communication is the great communicator,” Jack says, using the accent I assume he grew up with. “As soon as you deviate from that and you go into London speech, for example, you lose a little bit of the communication.” By that point, Jack has seamlessly transitioned into Cockney, from which he then shifts into the accents of East Anglia, the West Country, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Liverpool, Northern Ireland, Dublin, the Scottish highlands, Glasgow, North Wales, and South Wales. “

http://www.openculture.com/2014/04/a-brief-tour-of-british-accents-14-ways-to-speak-english-in-84-seconds.html

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Teenagers’ IQ scores can rise or fall sharply during adolescence

“IQ scores can change dramatically in teenage years in parallel with changes to the brain, according to a study that suggests caution in using the 11+ exam for grammar school entrance to predict academic ability. IQ is thought to be stable across a person’s life. Childhood scores are often used to predict education outcome and job prospects as an adult. But the study suggests scores are surprisingly variable.

classRobert Sternberg from Oklahoma State University, who studies intelligence but was not in the research team, said: “A testing industry has developed around the notion that IQ is relatively fixed and pretty well set in the early years of life. This study shows in a compelling way that meaningful changes can occur throughout the teenage years.” Our mental faculties are not fixed, he said: “People who are mentally active and alert will likely benefit, and the couch potatoes who do not exercise themselves intellectually will pay a price.” (…) The teens split evenly between those whose IQ improved and those whose IQ worsened. “It was not the case that young low performers got better, and the young high performers averaged out. Some highs got even better, and some lows got even worse,” said Price. (…) The study contradicts a long-standing view of intelligence as fixed. Alfred Binet, father of modern intelligence tests, believed mental development ended at 16, while child psychologist Jean Piaget thought it ended even earlier.”

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2011/oct/19/teenagers-iq-scores-adolescence

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TED’s Best Of The Week! Your elusive creative genius, by Elizabeth Gilbert

Funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk

creative-genius“And then the Renaissance came and everything changed, and we had this big idea, and the big idea was let’s put the individual human being at the center of the universe above all gods and mysteries, and there’s no more room for mystical creatures who take dictation from the divine. And it’s the beginning of rational humanism, and people started to believe that creativity came completely from the self of the individual. And for the first time in history, you start to hear people referring to this or that artist as being a genius rather than having a genius. And I got to tell you, I think that was a huge error. You know, I think that allowing somebody, one mere person to believe that he or she is like, the vessel, you know, like the font and the essence and the source of all divine, creative, unknowable, eternal mystery is just a smidge too much responsibility to put on one fragile, human psyche. It’s like asking somebody to swallow the sun. It just completely warps and distorts egos, and it creates all these unmanageable expectations about performance. And I think the pressure of that has been killing off our artists for the last 500 years. (…) But the process, and the heavy anxiety around it was released when he took the genie, the genius out of him where it was causing nothing but trouble, and released it kind of back where it came from, and realized that this didn’t have to be this internalized, tormented thing. It could be this peculiar, wondrous, bizarre collaboration kind of conversation between Tom and the strange, external thing that was not quite Tom.”

http://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_gilbert_on_genius#t-850863

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Person Of The Week! Leopold von Sacher Masoch!

Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (1836 – 1895) was an Austrian writer and journalist, who gained renown for his romantic stories of Galician life. During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction.

sacher-m

The term masochism is derived from his name, coined in 1886 by the Austrian psychiatrist Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing (1840–1902) in his book Psychopathia Sexualis:

“I feel justified in calling this sexual anomaly “Masochism”, because the author Sacher-Masoch frequently made this perversion, which up to his time was quite unknown to the scientific world as such, the substratum of his writings. I followed thereby the scientific formation of the term “Daltonism“, from Dalton, the discoverer of colour-blindness. During recent years facts have been advanced which prove that Sacher-Masoch was not only the poet of Masochism, but that he himself was afflicted with the anomaly. Although these proofs were communicated to me without restriction, I refrain from giving them to the public. I refute the accusation that “I have coupled the name of a revered author with a perversion of the sexual instinct”, which has been made against me by some admirers of the author and by some critics of my book. As a man, Sacher-Masoch cannot lose anything in the estimation of his cultured fellow-beings simply because he was afflicted with an anomaly of his sexual feelings. As an author, he suffered severe injury so far as the influence and intrinsic merit of his work is concerned, for so long and whenever he eliminated his perversion from his literary efforts he was a gifted writer, and as such would have achieved real greatness had he been actuated by normally sexual feelings. In this respect he is a remarkable example of the powerful influence exercised by the vita sexualis be it in the good or evil sense over the formation and direction of man’s mind.”

“Throughout history it has always been a serious deep culture which has produced moral character. Man even when he is selfish or evil always follows principles, woman never follows anything but impulses. Don’t ever forget that, and never feel secure with the woman you love.”

Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Venus in Furs

Watch interesting talk on the subject: <

Weekly choice, by peers

Glad to announce this new category of post that will be uploaded on a weekly basis and will have a selection of articles, videos, inspirational quotes and ideas and what ever constructive and creative link you have in mind.  It is open for any participation, recommendation from any of information you wish to share. It is a wonderful opportunity to interact and share our, as well as your, interesting cybernetic discoveries.

Thank you for your interest and don´t forget to add your link of the week.

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path to happinessMost everybody has heard that money doesn’t make you happy, other people don’t make you happy, and that you have to make yourself happy. Very few people will tell you how. (…) Happiness and fulfillment obtained solely from focusing on your external reality is fleeting and may leave you wondering, “Is this all there is?” To discover a greater and more lasting happiness you will have to follow a path of dismantling the virtual reality of the mind.”

http://www.pathwaytohappiness.com/happiness/2007/09/27/mind-affects-happiness/

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About communication style. “Your amygdala is probably saying to you and to me, “I don’t want to do either of those things. These people are obnoxious and unreasonable. Why should I kowtow to them?” Here are several reasons…”

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/10/how-to-listen-when-your-communication-styles-dont-match/

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TeaIf you want to make some tea, first learn how to make tea. Next gather all the ingredients you need. And then make tea. Don’t worry about whether it will come out right. Don’t worry if anyone will like it. Don’t worry about whether you are worthy of making tea. Don’t worry about coffee drinkers. Don’t worry if you will ever get to make tea again. Don’t worry about what you will do after you make tea. Just. make. tea. And when you are done, move on.”

http://tinybuddha.com/blog/6-simple-personal-commitments-to-overcome-low-self-esteem/

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TED’s best for the week:

If you want people to perform better, you reward them, right? Bonuses, commissions, their own reality show. Incentivize them… But that’s not happening here. You’ve got an incentive designed to sharpen thinking and accelerate creativity, and it does just the opposite. It dulls thinking and blocks creativity.”

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation.html

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images (1)Interested in being creative? See what they have to say about it!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weIQIthC3Ks&feature=youtu.be

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lou_reeThere were rumors that his feelings for Luisa and his enormous desire to conquer her, inspired Nietzsche’s literary potential. The famous philosopher used to say that she was a person with a brilliant mind and superb way of thinking, more than he had never seen before. It is believed that he actually marked Lou Salomé’s character in one of his most known books “Thus spoke Zarathustra”.

“You know these things as thoughts, but your thoughts are not your experiences, they are an echo and after-effect of your experiences: as when your room trembles when a carriage goes past. I however am sitting in the carriage, and often I am the carriage itself.
In a man who thinks like this, the dichotomy between thinking and feeling, intellect and passion, has really disappeared. He feels his thoughts. He can fall in love with an idea. An idea can make him ill.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvn_1VvTOSE

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Person of the week!

“I know my limits. That’s why I’m beyond.”

Jane+Birkin++Serge+Gainsbourg+flower
Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin

http://www.europeandme.eu/17diaphragm/921-study-like-serge-gainsbourg

For a wonderful French documentary about his life, click here