Weekly Choice: on a Story, Spirituality without religion and please go on Booksurfing

Over 100 MOOCS Getting Started in September! Enroll in One Today!

MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) provides many interesting, illuminating courses in different areas.  The courses are free and also can be a smart way to procrastinate. Summer craziness is over, take your chance today! For further information take a look on MOOC list below.

http://www.mooc-list.com/?gclid=CjwKEAjwp7WgBRCRxMCLx8mMnDMSJADncxS263plTIjBvwfqKNB635tU6xdaPvj7G9DhCOjnBImE5BoCAgnw_wcB

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TED’s Best Of The Week! Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story

Chimamanda comes from a conventional, middle-class Nigerian family. In an extremely articulated talk, she speaks about generalizations. Are generalizations helpful? Can we function without them? Is that a default in the way we think and perceive the world? If this TED talk she posit on this issue in a curious and enlighten way. Thus far she manages to capture the attention of more than seven million people, who will be next?

“I left Nigeria to go to university in the United States. I was 19. My American roommate was shocked by me. She asked where I had learned to speak English so well, and was confused when I said that Nigeria happened to have English as its official language. She asked if she could listen to what she called my “tribal music,” and was consequently very disappointed when I produced my tape of Mariah Carey. She assumed that I did not know how to use a stove. What struck me was this: She had felt sorry for me even before she saw me. Her default position toward me, as an African, was a kind of patronizing, well-meaning pity. My roommate had a single story of Africa: a single story of catastrophe. In this single story there was no possibility of Africans being similar to her in any way, no possibility of feelings more complex than pity, no possibility of a connection as human equals.”

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Legal murder. Legal abuse.

When someone would tell me to think of animals I would probably imagine a warm picture of myself cuddling my dog, giving her a bath and the good time I have with her. However, when one is removing her pink sunglasses, reality is quite different. What is happening? Humans are using animals for food, clothing, entertainment, and for scientific research.  In the US alone around 75,000 dogs (like mine and yours) and 22,000 cats dying every year from vivisection, many of them not even for a life saving medication but for shampoos, mascara and condoms. There are many accessible books and articles written on this subject, but until we witness it with our own eyes it’s all just dry and distant theory. Facebook is a great conscious buster about animal cruelty but is it enough (usually the sympathy doesn´t go beyond a short “it´s terrible” comment. We share the planet with animals, but instead of living with them we exploit, torture and abuse them in various ways, and all of that is today most gruesome Legal Murder, legal slavery, and rape.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKaCFyGdazo

If you are interested wish to learn more about this issue, here’s a link to “Earthlings”, an eye-opening documentary directed by Shaun Monson:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7cxmFugZMA

Here’s how to you too can do something about it:

– Don´t eat meat everyday

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethics_of_eating_meat

– If you see an abuse report it

http://www.pet-abuse.com/database/

– Avoid buying and using testing brands

http://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Buying-and-Using-Animal-Testing-Brands

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Waking Up: a guide to spirituality without religion

“I once participated in a twenty-three-day wilderness program in the mountains of Colorado. If the purpose of this course was to expose students to dangerous lightning and half the world’s mosquitoes, it was fulfilled on the first day. What was in essence a forced march through hundreds of miles of backcountry culminated in a ritual known as “the solo,” where we were finally permitted to rest—alone, on the outskirts of a gorgeous alpine lake—for three days of fasting and contemplation.

waking up

I had just turned sixteen, and this was my first taste of true solitude since exiting my mother’s womb. It proved a sufficient provocation. After a long nap and a glance at the icy waters of the lake, the promising young man I imagined myself to be was quickly cut down by loneliness and boredom. I filled the pages of my journal not with the insights of a budding naturalist, philosopher, or mystic but with a list of the foods on which I intended to gorge myself the instant I returned to civilization. Judging from the state of my consciousness at the time, millions of years of hominid evolution had produced nothing more transcendent than a craving for a cheeseburger and a chocolate milkshake.”

This is how the new book of Sam Harris begins. To read/listen to

http://www.samharris.org/blog/item/chapter-one

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Recommendation of the week, BookSurfing!

A new social experiment

 “More intimate than a book club, less process-y than group therapy, and more focused than a cocktail party! Book surfing is a unique way to get to know people, and get exposed to a lot of interesting ideas and texts.

Bring something to read to a small, intimate group (6-8 people), some of whom you don’t know.

The format has been distilled over time into 5 simple rules:

  1. Everybody present (6-8 people) reads aloud a text of their choice. (Bring two texts: if time permits there is a second round of readings).
  2. Any text is suitable: it can be Shakespeare, or your diary
  3. Texts read must not exceed 450 words. (Yes, it’s Twitter-like, but it’s proven a good length.)
  4. There has to be at least one newcomer to book surfing.
  5. There have to be some participants who don’t know each other.

booksurfing_There is a moderator who organizes and runs the meeting, and makes time available for discussion after each reading.

Simple rules, but they seem to guarantee an interesting experience!”

If you are interested in this social experiment follow the example of Book Surfing Seattle on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/booksurfingseattle/info

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And he was made to roam the earth… and grow!

The geographical journey that instigates and inspires the mental one will be the action that will carry us to distant and unknown regions of the intrinsic as well as the extrinsic world. A journey can be many things, but it is not a week’s vacation in a beach town, or a trip to a cosmopolitan city in a foreign country. A journey is always a trip of learning, differentiating itself from tourism (a short vacation) or traveling (a longer period of time).

hiking-backpacking

A journey has no time limit, but it involves diving into new cultures, into a unique path in an unfamiliar environment. A vacation, on the other hand, usually ends up with many “I’ve been there” photos and some nice stories to make friends and family jealous, while a journey consists of connecting to other cultures, learning about them, losing yourself to mother nature, whether alone or with a companion. The importance of the number of people who can join is crucial for the experience: one can never really contemplate nature or one’s surroundings when accompanied by a group of ten people. There will constantly be things to do and someone to talk to, and your attention will be more focused on the group itself than toward the new of the outside. In my personal opinion and experience, the solo journey is the most exhilarating and wholesome; followed by a journey of two friends, three if you really have to, and only after that comes a couple. Yes, two to three friends are better partners on a journey than your significant other, for as great as it is for couples to have these experiences, this bonding does not contribute the connection to the outside. In a couple’s journey, you do not change or evolve as a person but as a couple (a wonderful thing on its own).

Solo journeys of psychological and physical development are not rare in our world. The most commonplace, though, are found in literature, both fiction and biographies. In the Odyssey, for example, Homer’s Ulysses undergoes many tests, but the most important one, among the wars and quarrels with the gods, is the journey back to Ithaca. The journey is far from peaceful sailing along the Mediterranean shoreline—he faces hardships, death, and recognition in life. Many times he confronts the gods, good as well as evil, withstanding sacrifice and misery, through sorrow and, at times, joy and ecstasy. Many years pass before he can return to reign side by side with his dear wife.

What do you think would have happened if Ulysses had managed to get right back home after the war of Troy? It would not have been long until he would have found some other war to fight, or the next adventurous opportunity, always in a degenerating dissatisfaction. However, after the countless sights, fatigue, experiences, suffering, and death he survived, his perspective changed and he proved to himself that priorities change when they are viewed from a broader perspective.

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In the old world of the sage Greeks, with their idols and stories of heroism, there is a leitmotif—the long walk, the journey of many years. It is what every hero must undertake before being approved by the gods. Those years away from his confidence, far from the security of home, are the most important years of developing his character. Those are years in which the hero’s edification and his mode of action are shaped, and it is then when he becomes the person he is supposed to be, a savior and a hero of the gods. The weaker ones die on the way, but the survivors, the chosen ones, are strong—they are the ones who, with the right combination of strength and shrewdness, can overcome any obstacles and defeat the strongest of their enemy. Even Jesus, king of the Christians, is said to have traveled for many years before he started spreading the word. Moses had a revelation in the mountains before he could lead the children of Israel in the desert. The ancient Babylonian god Dagon disappeared at sea only to reappear years later in a hybrid form, half man, half fish, to lead his people to justice and greatness. Jacob fled his brother Esau and saw an angel descend a ladder from God to tell him the good news.

Dagon
Dagon

Muhammad, the prophet of Islam, learned from the many heroic stories of his predecessors; he went for years until that glorious moment when Allah called him to pass down to him the sacred word and distribute it among the lost, heterogeneous, scattered tribes throughout the Arab territory. He did his job so effectively that about two hundred years later the Muslims had become the most powerful union in that part of the world. Buddha is said to have journeyed for long years until he reached enlightenment and nirvana. Whether the Law of Moses or the New Testament, Islam, Buddhism, or other religions and beliefs (monotheistic, polytheistic, or animistic), almost every story of spiritual discovery unravels and begins with the story of the hero’s journey. In it, while facing the unknown, you need to re-examine your abilities every day as another reality, other problems that require new and creative solutions come about. You will spend many hours with yourself in constant introspection, sometimes conscious of the struggle inside and other times the enlightenment will arrive only in retrospect. A journey is one of the strongest examinations of the third division in trispectivism, the intercommunication, the interaction you, as an individual All, have to acknowledge in the face of the world, the universal All. Strengthening one aspect in the three divisions (whether the awareness of the individual, widening the perspectives of the universal, or simply improving the interaction) is also empowering and reinforces the other two.

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[This post is taken from Trispectivism, the section titled “Journeys” p. 183]